There are four different type two essay questions you might find in the IELTS and they can all be answered using fixed templates.  You can use these templates to answer just about every question you might encounter.

Solution to a Problem Essays

Paragraph One (Introduction)

  • Sentence One:  A hook.  This is an interesting sentence that introduces the topic without stating your main point.  Example:  "The problem of ______ has emerged as one of the most significant problems facing humans in the twenty-first century."
  • Sentence Two:  A transition.  Example:  "In the following essay I will discuss some of the biggest problems associated with _______, before suggesting a possible solutions."

Paragraph Two (Body)

  • One sentence which states the biggest problem.  Example:  "The main problem related to ____ is ______.
  • One sentence which provides more detail about this problem.
  • One sentence which states the consequences of this problem.
  • A specific example of this problem that might happen in the real world.

Paragraph Three (Body)

  • One sentence which states the best solution to this problem.  Example:  "In my opinion, the best way to overcome ______ is to _____.
  • One sentence which provides more information about this solution.
  • Two sentences which give an example of how this solution can be applied in a real-world situation

Paragraph Four (conclusion)

  • A one sentence restatement of the problem and solution
  • A "clincher," which is an interesting personal comment on the topic.

Opinion Essays (Agree/Disagree)

Paragraph One (Introduction)

  • Sentence One:  A hook.  This is an interesting sentence that introduces the topic without stating your main point.  Example:  "Censorship of the media has emerged as one of the most discussed issues of the modern era."
  • Sentence Two:  Your main idea.  Example:  "I strongly agree that it is never appropriate for the government to engage in media censorship."
  • Sentence Three:  A transition.  Example:  "I feel this way for two main reasons, which I will explore in the following essay."

Paragraph Two (Body)

  • A topic sentence that clearly states your first main reason.
  • One or two general sentences about this reason
  • A real-world example of this reason.
  • A conclusion (paraphrase your main point).

Paragraph Three (Body)

  • A topic sentence that clearly states your second main reason.
  • One or two general sentences about this reason.
  • A transition Example: "My personal experience is a good example of this."
  • A personal example from your life which illustrates your point (one or two sentences)

Paragraph Four (conclusion)

  • A one sentence restatement of your point.  Example: "In conclusion, I strongly believe..."
  • A paraphrase of your reasons.  Example: "This is because REASON ONE and REASON TWO."

Discussing Both Views Essays (Compare and Contrast)

Paragraph One (Introduction)

  • Sentence One:  A hook.  This is an interesting sentence that introduces the topic without stating your main point.  Example:  "The question of gender based schooling has emerged as one of the most discussed issues of the modern era."
  • Sentence Two:  Summarize the opposing viewpoints.  Example:  "Some people believe ______, while others feel that ______.
  • Sentence Three:  A transition.  Example:  "In this essay I will explore both points of view and state my opinions of each."

Paragraph Two (Body)

  • A one sentence statement of the first opinion.  Example:  "Many people feel strongly that _________.
  • One or two sentences that provide more information about this opinion.
  • One sentence that states your opinion on this.  Example: "I am of the opinion that this belief is faulty."
  • One sentence that describes why you feel this way.
  • An example from your life that supports your opinion.  One or two sentences.

Paragraph Three (Body)

  • A one sentence statement of the second opinion.  Example:  "On the other hand, others feel just as strongly that _________."
  • One or two sentences that provide more information about this opinion.
  • One sentence that states your opinion on this.  Example:  "I am of the opinion that this belief is quite correct."
  • One sentence that describes why you feel this way.
  • An example from your life that supports your opinion.  One or two sentences.

Paragraph Four (conclusion)

  • A description of the debate.  Example:  "In conclusion, both views regarding _____ have their merits."
  • A paraphrase of your opinion.  Example:  "However, as a result of my life experience, I strongly believe that ____."

Advantages and Disadvantages Essays (Compare and Contrast)

Paragraph One (Introduction)

  • Sentence One:  A hook.  This is an interesting sentence that introduces the topic without stating your main point.  Example:  "These days, more and more students are choosing to enroll in universities."
  • Sentence Two:  A transition.  Example:  "In this essay I will explore the advantages and disadvantages of _____ before giving my opinion on the issue."

Paragraph Two (Body)

  • A one sentence statement of the first advantage.  Example:  "One of the most cited advantages of _______ is ______.
  • One or two sentences that provide more information about this advantage.
  • One or two sentences that talk about a possible real-world (or something from your own life) example of this advantage in action.

Paragraph Three (Body)

  • A one sentence statement of the first advantage.  Example:  "One of the most cited advantages of _______ is ______.
  • One or two sentences that provide more information about this advantage.
  • One or two sentences that talk about a possible real-world (or something from your own life) example of this advantage in action.

Paragraph Four (conclusion)

  • A summary of the advantages and disadvantages. Example: "In conclusion, the main advantage of _____ is ____, while the primary disadvantage is ______."
  • A statement of your opinion.  Example:  "In light of the above, my personal belief is ________."