Schools Accepting TOEFL MyBest Scores

Important Update from 2020: ETS is now maintaining its own list of schools and organization that accept TOEFL MyBest Scores.  I probably won’t update my own list anymore.  You can find the official list as a PDF file right here.

The following institutions have stated publicly that they will accept TOEFL MyBest Scores. Note that this list could be out of date. It is best to contact the school you are interested in directly.

Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Source: “If you wish to send us “MyBest Scores”, we will accept them. All TOEFL scores we receive will be made available to the program reviewing your application. “

Miami University. Source: “We accept MyBest scores for the TOEFL. This means that the highest scores for each section from different TOEFL exams will determine a combined highest sum score.”

Carnegie Mellon School of Design. Source: “the School of Design also accepts MyBest scores for TOEFL iBT. “

Shoreline Community College. Source: “MyBest scores are accepted.

University of British Columbia College of Graduate Studies. Source: “The College of Graduate Studies accepts MyBest Scores.”

Northwestern (Graduate School). Source: “GS accepts the “MyBest scores”. A new reporting structure released by ETS in August 2019. These scores may be entered in the TOEFL section on the “Test Scores” page of the application form.”

University of Arizona (Graduate College). Source: “Individual MyBest scores must also be dated within 2 years of the enrollment term to be considered valid.”

University of Buffalo. Source.

CalArts. Source: “CalArts accepts “MyBest” scores delivered directly from ETS.”

San Francisco Conservatory of MusicSource: “SFCM will consider accepting the MyBest scores. We must have all score reports the MyBest scores are from submitted with the application, and the scores must be from within the past two years.”

The TOEFL Bulletin was updated sometime this month.  Normally I would list the line-by-line changes here, but those appear too numerous to list.  The policy changes, meanwhile, are just what has already been discussed here already.  Let me know, though, if there is something you want me to dig into.  This edition of the bulletin is valid until June 2020.  Here’s a link.

One thing that did catch my eye is that score review still takes up to three weeks. While students have reported getting those results really quickly (in three days) I guess ETS doesn’t want to make any official promises.

Students can now register for the TOEFL just two days before taking the test.  The deadline used to be four days before taking the test.  Just note that any registrations that occur within seven days of the test will include a 40 dollar late fee.  I’ve pasted in the graphic used by ETS to promote this change.

I guess it is good that ETS is providing a lot more flexibility (only one week wait time between test attempts, faster score reports, much faster score reviews, etc).

As always, complete your registration over here at ETS.

 

This week I was lucky enough to again have an opportunity to attend a workshop hosted by ETS for TOEFL teachers.  Here is a quick summary of some of the questions that were asked by attendees of the workshop.  Note that the answers are not direct quotes, unless indicated.

 

Q:  Are scores adjusted statistically for difficulty each time the test is given?

A: Yes.  This means that there is no direct conversion from raw to scaled scores in the reading and listening section.  The conversion depends on the performance of all students that week.

 

Q: Do all the individual reading and listening questions have equal weight?

A: Yes.

 

Q:  When will new editions of the Official Guide and Official iBT Test books be published?

A:  There is no timeline.

 

Q:  Are accents from outside of North America now used when the question directions are given on the test?

A: Yes.

 

Q:  How are the scores from the human raters and the SpeechRater combined?

A:  “Human scores and machines scores are optimally weighted to produce raw scores.”  This means ETS isn’t really going to answer this question.

 

Q: Can the human rater override the SpeechRater if he disagrees with its score?

A: Yes.

 

Q:  How many different human raters will judge a single student’s speaking section?

A:  Each question will be judged by a different human.

 

Q:  Will students get a penalty for using the same templates as many other students?

A:   Templates “are not a problem at all.”

 

Q: Why were the question-specific levels removed from the score reports?

A: That information was deemed unnecessary.

 

Q:  Is there a “maximum” word count  in the writing section?

A:  No.

 

Q:  Is it always okay to pick more than one choice in multiple choice writing prompts?

A:  Yes.